Early in his career, Mark helped to establish a new school of architecture at Chiang Mai University in northern Thailand.

Mark Dannettel has 25 years of experience in architecture, engineering, façade design and building technology in both Asia and the U.S. He leads the Façade Engineering practice in the firm’s U.S. West and Pacific Rim regions. His façade consulting work includes numerous commercial and residential towers, civic and institutional structures, hospitals, airports and hotels.

Cable-Nets and Other Complex Façades
Prior to joining Thornton Tomasetti in 2007, he worked as a specialist façade contractor, with built projects including the Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies in Chicago, a cable-net and double façade for the Loyola Information Commons in Chicago, and a cable-supported glass wall for the Newseum in Washington, D.C. He has worked in architectural practices, engineering/consulting firms and construction companies.

Giving Back to the Profession
Mark is the author of several publications and papers on building skins and high-performance architecture and engineering over the past two decades, and he frequently presents at industry conferences worldwide. He has contributed his time to academic teaching at several universities, including Southern California Institute of Architecture, where he taught a class on advanced building skins.

Worldwide Work and Travel
Originally from Maryland, Mark’s career has taken him around the world several times. He has traveled to Australia, Canada, China, Germany, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Taiwan, the United Arab Emirates and the UK. Before settling in Los Angeles, he lived in Phoenix, Hong Kong, Singapore and Thailand.

Expertise
• Cable-supported glass walls and cable-nets • AESS (Architecturally exposed structural steel)
• Double façades
• Structural glass and point-supported glass
• Unitized curtain walls and high-rise construction
• ETFE (Ethylene tetrafluoroethylene)
• Complex geometries and parametric modeling for façades
• Façade forensics and glass failures