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Project

O'Hare Int'l Airport, L Concourse Stinger

The 50,000-square-foot American Airlines L Concourse Stinger expansion features the first new gates added to Chicago's O’Hare International Airport in 25 years.

Lead Contact

Project Details

Project Partners
Corgan
Location
Chicago, Illinois
Completion Date
Area
50,000 ft²
Number of Gates
5
Project Awards

ENR, Airport/Transit Award of Merit, 2018

American Airlines L Concourse Stinger at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago. F.H. Paschen photo
American Airlines L Concourse Stinger at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago. F.H. Paschen photo
American Airlines L Concourse Stinger at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago. F.H. Paschen photo
American Airlines L Concourse Stinger at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago. F.H. Paschen photo
American Airlines L Concourse Stinger at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago. F.H. Paschen photo
American Airlines L Concourse Stinger at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago. F.H. Paschen photo

Overview

The 50,000-square-foot American Airlines L Concourse Stinger expansion features the first new gates added to Chicago's O’Hare International Airport in 25 years. The five new regional gates in the expansion are accessed from the existing Terminal 3 building via a 600-foot three-span pedestrian walkway. The new Concourse building and the bridge are located within a tightly confined site and required coordination with major existing underground utilities including a 180-foot-long by 80-foot-wide underground water reservoir.

We provided structural, facade, sustainability and construction engineering services to Corgan for the expansion, which opened in 2018. 

Highlights

  • In order to avoid impacting the underground water reservoir, a major portion of the Stinger building is supported by a combination of story-deep and long-span roof trusses.
  • The pedestrian bridge is designed as a three-span continuous box truss between isolated foundations. These systems of trusses minimize the number of foundations to reduce the occurrence of conflicts with existing utilities.
  • During the design phase, an extensive potholing and surveying program was undertaken by the CMR to verify as-built utility information, which was incorporated into the final design of the foundation and superstructure.